[BCAB] Labelling Documents Karl Farrell 25 Nov 2012 17:03 GMT
Re: [BCAB] Labelling Documents Michael A. Ray 25 Nov 2012 17:24 GMT

Re: [BCAB] Labelling Documents Michael A. Ray 25 Nov 2012 17:24 GMT

Hello

It strikes me that some way of putting a small bar code in a document
footer would do the job in conjunction with a simple database.

It is possible to buy a hand-held barcode reader from Amazon for about
25 quid.  They plug into a USB port and when a code is successfully read
the scanner sends a 'return' character, which when the caret is placed
in a search box would initiate a lookup.  I use one and identify
products I have bought from Tesco by going to the Tesco web-site and
scanning the bar code into the search box.

I could easily create such a database program, as I'm sure many on this
list could.  The harder bit is getting a bar-code into a document footer.

Of course, there is probably someone selling either sheets of, or rolls
of bar-code labels.

This would be a good solution for a volume of documents but doesn't help
you identify documents on the move.

There are apps for iPhone and Android phones that will read Q-codes with
the phones in-built camera.  It's a short step from that to an online
repository of documents that would allow a user to identify any
document, even sitting on a bus.  Any sizeable organisation could make
more use of that than just identifying documents for the 1% of it's
employees that are VI.

Mike

On 25/11/2012 17:03, Karl Farrell wrote:
> Hello everyone
>
> This message relates to Gerard's recent enquiry about labelling documents
> that, presumably, he needs to keep by his desk.  Most of us surely would
> prefer to have available an accessible digital library of our important
> documents but I suppose Gerard needs hardcopy documents for other peoples'
> benefit.  So this is the kind of office problem we had to deal with in the
> eighties.
>
> The more simple the solution, the better and I trust Gerard uses braille.
> If there are documents of up to seven A4 pages each, there are folders you
> can buy with 50 clear plastic sleeves.  You could get such a folder and
> label the sleeves in braille 1 to 50: using adhesive braille labels would be
> best.  The sighted people can identify the document through the clear
> plastic but Gerard would have to set up a register of the documents and what
> sleeve number they were in.  The register could be in the form of a document
> file, a spreadsheet or in braille.
>
> If multiple documents need to be kept together, then cardboard wallets or a
> complete filing system would be needed.  What makes this physically quick
> and efficient is the braille labelling of the pockets or dividers.  I would
> go for numbers because they take up less space and you can update the
> register as and when things change but the labels don't change.
>
> If you are dealing with commercial documents in an office setting, I suggest
> you investigate Voiceye from Sight and Sound.  This is about electronic
> labelling of hardcopy documentation.  It also gives access to the contents.
>
> Karl Farrell
>
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Bcab [mailto:bcab-bounces@lists.bcab.org.uk] On Behalf Of Michael A.
> Ray
> Sent: 25 November 2012 15:38
> To: BCAB Discussion List
> Subject: Re: [BCAB] Braille Demo Gun
>
> Gerard,
>
> I think you mean Braille 'DYMO' Gun rather than 'Demo' gun?
>
> I have one which I bought from the RNIB, but I have stopped using it because
> every time you press down to cut the tape, a small section of tape finds
> it's way into the insides of the gun.  After a while these clog up the gun
> and the tape will no longer insert into the thing.  It is possible to take
> the thing apart and empty the accumulated fragments of tape out, but that
> gets to be a drag after a while.
>
> Instead I use one of the metal things that the RNIB sell to Braille onto
> Dymo tape with my Perkins.  The Braille is much more tactile than from a
> Dymo gun, but of course a Perkins isn't especially portable.
>
> Mike
>
>
> On 25/11/2012 14:49, Gerard Sadlier wrote:
>> Hi all,
>>
>> What is this, how does it work and where could I get one if I wanted it?
>>
>> Ger
>>
>
> --
> Michael A. Ray
>
> Analyst/Programmer
> Witley, Surrey, South-east UK
>
> Ham Radio Callsign: G4XBF, licenced since 1982
>
> Use the NVDA screen-reader, not Scientific, just Freedom
>
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--
Michael A. Ray

Analyst/Programmer
Witley, Surrey, South-east UK

Ham Radio Callsign: G4XBF, licenced since 1982

Use the NVDA screen-reader, not Scientific, just Freedom